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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 143 (some duplicates have been removed)
are very important economy of western europe but i think we're clear on that but economy is more of course than just football. new york's jobless rate fell for the first time elite and 11 months, in september. yet it remains well above the national average, and in western europe the rate is up slightly. we've been talking at this for years how to fix the economy in western europe. what is one thing, mr. collins, in your opinion that needs to be done to turn around this long-standing issue? had he proposed to achieve that if you're elected to congress? collins: it is about jobs. i'm the only get here u.s. spent mostly entire to recreate and jobs, 6-under jobs and families are relying on. first thing we have to repeal obamacare. obamacare is a wet blanket in the economy today with trillions of dollars of taxes, fees and we are faced with government takeover of health care threatening my 85 year old mom medicare advantage. we have to get rid of that. went to grow our economy 4% a year. that means reducing the marginal tax rate on the dairy farmers, the crop farmers from the small business peo
belong to some organized religion. now compare to that -- you know, like in western europe in every country in western europe, it is less than 50% of people who asubscribe to an organized religion. usually it's in the 40, 45% range across the board. and for those who attend church regularly, it is way way down. 16% in france, 10% in the uk go to church regularly. and here in this country 80% say they belong to a church and attend regularly. and when you think about that here is the real question i have got for you. what does that say about us as a people? if 80% of americans are such godly people if we as a nation are one nation under god, why are we still practicing the death penalty? hum? why are we still building nuclear weapons? for massive kills of innocent people around the world. why are we so gung ho on war? we're the most war like people, i think on the planet when you look at the wars that we started in this country. why do we still have discrimination against people of color, gays and lesbians women muslims, arabs, all of which we tolerate, and a lot of i
side of the geopolitical balance, orchestrating the economic recovery of western europe, the marshall plan and several other things, if we could simply hold the then, then in time, the soviet system would from the weight of its own internal contradictions implode, and it would do so peacefully, and a war would not be necessary. that's the vision of 1946, 1947, not a bad prediction actually of what wound up happening between 1987 and 1991 if you think about it. that's a pretty good anticipation of that, but one of the nings i've been interested in as someone who teached grand strategy, and how they could see that far into the future and make that prediction in the first place? did this come from the careful study of international relations theory? did it come from the detailed readings of the diplomatic history? what i found very much to my surprise is that it came from neither. it came from reading great books. this brings us around to why we're here today. it came from reading great books of russian literature, not in the soviet period. there were not that many, yet, in this period a
. were actually helped western europe, not eastern europe, which helped western europe after the second world war and had nothing to do with europe. it was the u.s., the marshall plan which allows money to build part of western europe as part of their contribution compared to the east, which was under soviet control. so why bring me eu in after the war? [indiscernible] to keep europe under some kind of control, and it is not working. european citizens in different parts of europe will be laughing at this decision. >> tariq ali, thank you for being with us, a british- pakistani political commentator, historian, activist, filmmaker, novelist, author of over 20 books including, "the duel: pakistan on the flight path of american power." this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. when we come back, we expand the debate. we bring two third party vice- presidential candidates into the vice presidential debate that was held last night in kentucky. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report.
of the biggest gold deposits in western europe. mining here is lucrative, even if the excavation is costly environmental regulations strict. the people are divided on the issue. some residents are banding together to raise support for the mine. the mother of this young family is one of them. like 40% of the population, she is out of work. >> i hope that thanks to the mine, we will be able to stay and our family will have a future here. otherwise, we will have to move away. >> but where to? the effects of the economic crisis are being felt across spain. in this region, there is little industry outside of traditional coal mining, and its days are numbered. the regional government could sorely use the tax revenue the gold mine would generate. the socialist-led government does not want to talk about the controversial project on camera. if the conservatives had their way, the mine would already be open and creating jobs. >> we thought gold mining was history here. but in recent years, it is once again -- it has once again become an option. it is not an easy option. but one that is full of oppor
for the integration of eastern and western europe that would come later. on october the third, 1990, germans from east and west celebrated the reunification. hear, the wall started to crumble. the chancellor had worked out the details. , "gorbachev's approval was key. they signed the treaty in august 31, 1990. it was the end of divided germany and the beginning of a new germany that would grow to become europe's largest economy. as he continued his speech coming he said the germans had shown tremendous solidarity toward one another. he said a similar effort must be made on the process of european integration. >> only in europe, working with our neighbors and partners in this community, can we, and will we, be able to achieve our common goals, as they are described in our national anthem, unity, justice, and freedom. >> it was a message of hope in the face of mounting economic and social tensions across the european union. >> 31 people are dead in the syrian city of aleppo after a suicide bombing in the government controlled part of the city. >> aleoppo has been a major battleground. the two sides seem
friday. now over towards europe, also seeing a cooldown. we have this frontal area pushing across western europe off towards germany and poland, some autumn-like temperatures. london and paris at 12 and 13. yeah, still summer-like across the mediterranean, rome at 24 here on your saturday. here's your extended forecast. ♪ >>> and with that, we conclude this hour's "newsline." i'm james tengan in tokyo. thanks for watching.
to the first century. let's skip the first 17 centuries of that and take us to western europe and what happens with immigration of into the united states and how that affects the sisters and the images that people have. >> all right. go back a little bit further than that. in the 1600s, 1700s. so the first time -- actually a little bit before that. the sisters who were nuns who were cloistered who entered their religious communities did not come out. did not have external ministries. okay. that was pretty much the type of religious life that you had in europe in the 1700s and so on. as the united states, or what became the united states, when it was discovered, it was largely populated, as we know by people coming first from england. so basically, protestants who were the first citizen ores the first dwellers in this country. and some sisters from these largely cloistered orders came to the united states to help evangelize as it were the people who -- the indigenous people who were here. but what happened from about 1830 until the middle of the 1900s was huge waves of immigration of as we know
is western europe's biggest natural gas exporter, producing about 100 billion cubic meters per year. its german partner has been pushing statoil to expand operations in the region. they have licenses from more than 40 fields off the norwegian coast. the latest deal gives them their rights to three additional oil and gas fields for slightly more than 1 billion euros. the company also plans to team up with statoil in opening up another gas reserves in the dairy year future -- in the very near future. they are planning to invest 2 billion euros in tapping oil and gas reserves off of norway and britain. >> siemens says it is pulling out of the solar-energy industry, saying the sector has not been as profitable as hoped. >> company is in talks with potential buyers for its solar division. siemens says its renewable- energy operations will concentrate on wind power and hydroelectric energy. >> profits in germany's solar industry may be something, but the german government is enjoying record tax revenues. >> receipts surged more than 4% compared with september of last year, largely due to stabl
. finally let's go over to europe. thick clouds are approaching western europe from the atlantic. right now thunderstorms gusty winds and lots of heavy rain are occurring in iceland in part of the british isles where wet and windy conditions will then spread through parts of the south italy over the next 24 hours. out east rainshowers in northwestern russia will be decreasing from your afternoon hours. but the next storm system is on its way from turkey. temperatures out looking like this. 9 degrees expected in moscow with rain, sunny skies, for stockholm with a high of 8 degrees. out toward the west, 18 in paris and 23 in madrid and rain in lisbon with a high of 23. that's it for me now. here's your extended forecast. >>> and that is all for now in this edition of "newsline." thank you very much for joining thank you very much for joining us. tokyo. >>> nato ministers say they're
because i myself come from western europe and there is a similar tendency there but i see major differences and that was a concern of people who -- being actually scared that christians in america would follow the same as in europe that ultimately led to a decline of people going to the church. >> do you find that on and i find it anecdoteally, people call themselves spiritual but not religious. >> correct. and that is an interesting element. in many cases, they believe in god and makes them different from allegation if thes, of course. and we're talking about a number of people that believe in god and they re-lay that to a concern for nature and earth. they see god in those things, too, which is what we call under the larger name of -- this is a spiritual person, so, indeed, someone who doesn't connect the institution of church to the concept of god. >> ellen, the assistant professor of theology and religious studies at catholic university. thank you for coming in tonight. >> you're welcome. >>> >>> let's see if we can get the rain out of here and warm it up. >> some drizzle to
. some conservatives call that a namistate. the truth is what the president wants is what western europe has. a giant government that redistributes income. the problem is social justice costs a lot of money. and some european countries like greece are now exploding in violence because the greek government has run out of cash. it can no longer pay the huge entitlement. so these people are angry. they want to destroy the establishment. with the usa owing more than $16 trillion, those scenes could happen here. it is conceivable. if we keep spending a trillion dollars more than we take in, we will eventually go broke. the only reason we aren't bankrupt yet is that folks overseas are still buying treasury bonds and other u.s. investments. that could stop in a hurry. president obama has not addressed the issue. his theme is, if you tax wealthy americans and corporations more then the debt will get under control. but the figures don't back that up. right now the federal government spends more on welfare than on any other program. and we are not talking about medicare or social security. we are
revenue growth and that is what we are going to focus on because western europe's demise in the unemployment market here. liz: you mentioned in tell. we have a former chairman craig barrett who had run the company for many years and he is here with so much to talk about. where do you stand on this and what is the best way to make money with the way you are viewing the market? >> we have to look at this from a long review. in the short-term there will be a lot of volatility. the markets will go up or down. the economy may or may not do better depending who gets elected. all, we what we need to look at from a google perspective and microsoft perspective and intel perspective is where is the market going? how are we transitioning? we are moving from a fixed market place where people buy lots of pcs or sit at home all the time looking at their tv sets to one where we are mobile. dave: we have a slight correction that has come in on microsoft. what is it? >> the adjusted revenue picture. seventeen.four billion. here is something interesting as we report this to you. according
to an organization. systematically displaced. western europe, the united said -- the united states. john: the government said they are not perfect. >> and we can create giant constituencies that will reinforce each other. you talk about 15,000 employees in the new york city welfare system. every one of those is a voter. they'd all like to see the systems cut. john: you argue that these mutual let societies would take care of the people they needed help if they were still around today that they would do a better job than his 15,000 employees. >> they would, could, can, and should. i give you one example the works really well in this invisible the most people. our caller synonymous. any city in the united states, 24 hours a day you can call in number. those meetings every night of the weeks. john: and it works a lot better than government rehabilitation programs. [applause] thank-you. next, a new place without a welfare state. a free city isabout to be born. what will that be like? we will take you there next. ♪ john: in america of the welfare state grows and government takes more power.
that with the attitude of the east europeans, if there had ever been a red army of western europe with the red army troops have remained loyal? after 40 years of thinking about the cold war i had never thought about that question until this kid asked it. i learn a lot from my students i can tell you. i don't know what the answer is but it was a great question. >> host: how well known was george f. kennan during his lifetime? >> guest: quite well known. he was one of the great public intellectuals of the cold war period. when his article be anonymous article that appeared in foreign affairs in 1947 with a mysterious title x which laid out that strategy, that made him famous. if he had signed the article george f. kennan no one would have noticed. signing it x may have an immediate figure. he was always from that time a very prominent individual and because he was a beautiful speaker and because he wrote compellingly and he was extremely visible he had a great deal of influence as a public interest -- intellectual. he was not a television personality because television preceded him. when he would do
the country deadlocked, but i find it hard to believe that 50% of us want to be western europe! maybe i'm wrong, but that's very confusing to me. really? do you want to be greece? do you want to be spain? because that's where this country is headed. what do you think these people are rioting about in europe? what? they're angry the governments are cutting back on entitlements, they're furious they may lose free stuff! that's why they're attacking the police. this is what the nanny state mentality leads to. give me free stuff or i will hurt you. jon stewart is not going to buy that. i told him, but he just doesn't believe it. however, it is so i hope you'll all watch this debate. it's available on the rumble 2012. com right now. costs 4.95. you can watch it any time you want. finally, so many people tried to watch the rumble on saturday night, the server crashed, whatever that means. but everything is fixed now, they tell me. so if you want to see it, you can see it. and in the spirit of patriotism, both stewart and are you giving half the proceeds to charity. we show you more clips a bi
are paying the tax then membership dues. they were displaced in western europe and the united states>> they said we can do better. >> we can create giant constituencies that reinforce each other. >> you talk about 50,000 employees in the new york city welfare system. every one of those is a voert also. they don't like to see the systems cut. cut. >> you argue that these mu tile aid societies would take care of people who need help if they were still around they would do a better job if there were 50,000 plies? >> it would, can and should. no question about it. one example that works well it is invisible to people. out there 24-hours a day. you can call someone to talk to if you have an alcohol problem. there are meetings every night of the week people can go to to feel like they have a problem. >> it works better than government rehabilitation programs. >> thank you. thank you tom palmer. next, a new place without a welfare state. we will take you there next. we will take you there next. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, b
in prison and in jails in this country on drug offenses than western europe has in their prisons and jails on all offenses. this has to end. we the american people need to come together, right, left, it doesn't matter about partisanship. we need to demand immediately an end to this insane war on drugs. [applause] >> virgil goode. >> i am an advocate of a balanced budget, and i would cut federal spending on the war on drugs. however, drug use is primarily a state issue, not a federal issue. but this is ven going to set well with most 6 -- with most of you. i am not for legalizing marijuana use or other drug use. if we cut back on the war on drugs, that would be a minor part of the federal budget. about $12 billion is being spent this year out of $3.8 trillion budget on the war on drugs. but i am not for funding planned parenthood. i will take that to zero. i am not for funding -- >> we're on drugs. >> i know. but i'm just pointing out how small the federal war on drugs money is in terms of the entire federal government, but i am in favor of reducing it because we have to reduce everything t
at some of the heavy rain coming down and ocean city maryland. it is expected to move into western europe tonight and move into canada t sheriff and beats down on us for a good long 24-36 hours. >> again they announced the cancellation of early voting in maryland. the mayor says he hopes to find a way to make up voting hours. >> we also have superstar on sandy and his of sex in new york's brooklyn battery. this is the tunnel with water and side. normally the visit tow rope connects manhattan. the holland tunnel as well early as today floodwaters. the mayor said it was an extraordinary amount more in lower manhattan. on at how why the system is compared to the states it is impacting. we're seeing lots of areas of leand read indicating my raw to heavy rain. this system sandy, is expected to go as far north as canada and as far west as the great lakes before it starts to lose steam. again take a look at the colored blocks on your screen these of the watches and warning for almost nine tenths of an inch for washington d.c.. not as heavy as we saw last night but still a force to be reckoned wi
centers in western europe. and with this region, they said, the united states should hold and questioned hour with military and economic supremacy while ensuring the limitation of any exercise of sovereignty by states that might interfere with these global designs. and those were pretty realistic plans at the time, given the enormous disparity of power. the u.s. had been by far the richest country in the world, even before the second world war, although, it's not yet the major global actor during the second world war, the honest it's gained enormously industrial production and almost quadrupled, goddess of the depression. meanwhile, industrial rivals were devastated or seriously weakened. so that was an unbelievable system of power. the policies that were outlined in still hold. you can read them in government pronouncements. the capacity to implement them has significantly decline. there is a major scene now in foreign policy discussion, journalism, and so on. it is called "american declined." for example, in the most prestigious establishment, international relations turn, foreign affa
the company's guidance may be beatable. and then strength in euro. they get 37% of the sales from western europe. when europe gets stronger, the exchange rate gives them a nice boost to earnings which they translate back into relatively weak dollars. the feel good story there is a lot of reasons to like mondelez. on top of everything else, it has the 9.1%. not as big as kraft's, but kraft with not nearly enough growth with the price to earnings multiple. the bottom line. now that the breakup story has played out, you need to sell your kraft foods because we're siding with mondelez in the divorce. and let me tell you something. we're taking the alimony and the child support and all the property too, yeah, that will be a win! okay. let's go to chris in texas, please. chris? >> caller: hey, jim, good afternoon. >> what's shaking? >> caller: hey, not much. my question is on general mills. i bought this stock primarily for the good dividend yield. but my question is on the growth potential of the stock price. general mills reported this year that 25% of its global sales are non-u.s., and that
industrialized country. >> right. it may not be more than china but anywhere in western europe and most of the countries of the western hemisphere. this has been a very challenging global economic environment. you're hard pressed to lay that at the president's door. if romney was president i would say the same thing. the president has a lot of power but controlling the wealth of the global system is beyond what the president is capable of doing and we're living in a little bit of a fantasy land when we act like everything that's gone on economically in the united states in the past four wears is a product of administration policies which will change if that administration gets change. >> part of what governor romney had to say regarding gdp, slow economic growth means slow job growth and declining take home pay. this is what four years of president obama's policy has produced. americans are ready for change. what do you make of that? mitt romney says he's the agent of change. the president says the policies that are being outlined by republicans not change it's just bush. >> yeah. i thi
western europe and you say some of these jihaddists are people we're uncomfort able with and therefore we should not ship them weapons. tough choice. you want to take out assad as rapidly as possible or do you want to avoid siding with people who you might be uncomfortable with? >> suarez: paul pillar, do you sort it out that way? >> yes, i do. what this most reminds me of is the assistance of rebels against the soviets in afghanistan going back more than 20 years. the united states and the saudis and others provided assistance mostly through the pakistanis. there were several rebel elements some of which we would describe as hard-line islamists. they happened to be the most effective fighters against the soviets. we shouldn't be surprised if in a situation like syria, some of the groups that we would describe as hard-line islam i haves are some of the more effective fighters but basically we have a very confused situation on the opposition side. we have something called the free syrian army bull it's not really an army. th's sort of an umbrella term we've applied to a motley set of group
something new in a new opportunity there. whether it was opening up trade in western europe after the war or whatever. you have to know history to see the opportunities. this guy has no evidence of any history in his brain. he doesn't understand why the iranians hate us. he's never gone back. you go to a movie theater and you learn it with "argo." why they hate us. i don't think romney wants to know why. i think he has this sort of mechanical reaction that's based upon mimicry. i think we have a problem with him in terms of the knee owe kinds. look how they took over w. and dan quayle. they take over people who don't have it. they give them an ideology. but there's no brain there. they kept the tree up. they know how to use people of thin wit. i look at dan seno. the other day. they said the president, the candidate romney didn't have the talking points. where did they come from? they didn't come from him. they came from one of those guys. and he wasn't up to date. what a confession. the guy is a puppet. >> the issue of the lack of -- the issue of the degree of interest is the point i'm t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 143 (some duplicates have been removed)